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Seafarer Happiness Index (SHI) Q4 2021 reflects a depressed, stressed and frustrated workforce

News & Insights 21 February 2022

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Seafarers Happiness Index (SHI) Quarter 4 2021 results wraps up 2021, demonstrating how the ‘general happiness’ of seafarers goes hand in hand with the international response to the yo-yo nature of Covid. Where there has been an...

Seafarer Happiness Index (SHI) Q4 2021 reflects a depressed, stressed and frustrated workforce

Seafarers Happiness Index (SHI) Quarter 4 2021 results wraps up 2021, demonstrating how the ‘general happiness’ of seafarers goes hand in hand with the international response to the yo-yo nature of Covid. Where there has been an opening up of movement, the optimism has seen sentiment rise, while in times of rising infections and movement bans, the fears and frustrations are mirrored accordingly.

Q4 SHI reports an overall average score of 6.41/10, down from 6.59 in Q3, reflecting a depressed, stressed, and frustrated workforce.

At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, the world took some time to adapt and adopt measures to ensure the safety of its people and implement a model that complemented covid restrictions yet allowed for life to go on with minimal disruptions.

The maritime industry has struggled to do the same with varying levels of success. Crew changes were the first to be in limbo and the minority who secured a safe passage home echoed experiences of being seen as ‘bringers of disease’ and ‘treated like outcasts by various port authorities at every port’.

As international press covered the Suez Canal closure, the importance of shipping and seafarers once again entered the limelight. Despite the impact of delays in global trade and the potential staggering losses/profits that are enabled by the maritime industry, it did not gain sufficient momentum for key/essential worker status to be accorded to seafarers worldwide.

The recent spate of events has fired up seafarers to question the levels of risk and reward.

From small scale injustices and frustrations to life and career changing realisations, many are registering a sense of deep and entrenched despair and anger. A growing number of respondents have said that they will be completing their trip and not coming back or seeking other roles within maritime. This could mean the industry should anticipate a shortage of replacement crews and a drain of seafarers in the near future.

Seafaring may never recover unless life at sea is improved and seafarers get the recognition and respect that they deserve.

Stay tuned to this space as we unpack Q4 results, piece together the seafarer condition and what implications this has for all of us.  

The Loss Prevention department at Standard Club is dedicated to improving seafarer welfare, and testament to that commitment, the club is a signatory on the Neptune Declaration on Seafarer Wellbeing and Crew Change as well as a proud sponsor of the Seafarers Happiness Index, a report by Mission to Seafarers.

Category: Loss Prevention

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