Sailors' Society Wellness at Sea - Peer Support and the myths of mental health

News & Insights 9 August 2021

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Seafarer wellbeing has been a focal topic for Standard Club in recent years, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic and we are proud to be working in partnership with Sailors’ Society’s Wellness at Sea programme, sharing...

Sailors' Society Wellness at Sea - Peer Support and the myths of mental health

Seafarer wellbeing has been a focal topic for Standard Club in recent years, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic and we are proud to be working in partnership with Sailors’ Society’s Wellness at Sea programme, sharing helpful advice and resources over the next few months.

In this cycle, we will be sharing more about mental health, what you and your loved ones can do to stay mentally healthy, as well as the benefits of having a peer support group.

Given how loosely the term ‘mental health’ is often used, having a clear definition would be helpful in our understanding of this concept.

Sailors’ Society defines mental health as an aspect that encompasses our emotional, psychological, and social wellbeing. It influences how we think, feel and act. It is a key factor in how we handle stress, relate to others and make choices.

On the other hand, mental illness is when someone lacks the ability to manage day-to-day events and/or control their behaviour so that basic physical, social and emotional needs are threatened or unmet.

Following on from these definitions, it is also useful to address some common myths about mental health.

1. Myth: 'Mental health problems are very rare.'

1 in 4 people will be affected by mental health illness at some point in their lifetime.

2. Myth: 'I don’t know anyone struggling with their mental health.'

Someone you know, working with you or in your family, may well have experienced a mental health issue.

3. Myth: 'Mental illness is the result of bad parenting.'

Mental health is the result of a complex number of emotional, physical, environmental, biological and psychological factors

4. Myth: 'People do not recover from mental health problems.'

People can and do recover from mental illness - and in many cases they come back much stronger.

5. Myth: 'It won’t happen to me.'

Mental health does not discriminate on age, race, gender or background. It can happen to anyone

Standard Club has also put together links and resources that you and your families can reach out to should you need any assistance.

Here are details on how you could join a Peer Support Group run by Sailors’ Society. It is a safe space where you can share stories, ask for assistance or advice, and get access to welfare services.

Stay tuned to this space as more resources from both Standard Club and Sailors’ Society will be shared regularly. 

Category: Loss Prevention

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